Fuck Yeah Texas

A collection of what makes this state great.

blue-eyed-devil-88:

Happy Independence Day

bothkindsofmusic:

naturalbornworldshakers:

“In 1974 Waylon was ornery and mean. He was also vital and real. He wasn’t a nice guy, like Willie… he was raw and direct and just generally pissed off. (he also was never better than 1974) So, on that night in ’74 when I walked to the front of the stage at the Armadillo and saw the other photographers cowering away from the stage I had a choice… cower or shoot. I chose to shoot. Good thing. It turns out he had just kicked the camera of Charlyn Zlotnik and hated photographers. So I shot him glaring at me….which 30 or so years later was exactly what the art director was looking for. Album cover Waylon Live, BMG Heritage. Funny how things sometimes work out…” — Photo © copyright Scott Newton
See more…

Click through for Scott Newton’s legendary country photography from Austin in the mid-70s. Much greatness.

bothkindsofmusic:

naturalbornworldshakers:

“In 1974 Waylon was ornery and mean. He was also vital and real. He wasn’t a nice guy, like Willie… he was raw and direct and just generally pissed off. (he also was never better than 1974) So, on that night in ’74 when I walked to the front of the stage at the Armadillo and saw the other photographers cowering away from the stage I had a choice… cower or shoot. I chose to shoot. Good thing. It turns out he had just kicked the camera of Charlyn Zlotnik and hated photographers. So I shot him glaring at me….which 30 or so years later was exactly what the art director was looking for. Album cover Waylon Live, BMG Heritage. Funny how things sometimes work out…” — Photo © copyright Scott Newton

See more…

Click through for Scott Newton’s legendary country photography from Austin in the mid-70s. Much greatness.

nglspecialcollectionsandarchives:

March to the Grave

On March 2nd, the people of Huntsville, TX celebrate two important events. The first is Texas Independence day and the other is the birthday of beloved Texas hero General Sam Houston. To honor these two events, Huntsville residents throw a number of celebrations and tributes. One of those tributes is a march to the grave of General Sam Houston who is buried in Oakwood cemetery. Starting in 1889, students, faculty, and others would march from Austin College building on the Sam Houston campus to Sam Houston’s grave.

Check out these pictures of people marching to the grave throughout the years.

If you are interested in learning more, check out this podcast on the subject from Cheryl Spencer, Library Associate in Special Collections.

http://library.shsu.edu/about/podcasts/audio/Musings_March2Parade_20090301.mp3

(Credit to University Archives for the photographs)

haveiphone-willtravel:

Telephone, Texas Population 210
The community received its name because the only telephone in the area was located in a general store owned by Pete Hindman. When Hindman applied for permission to open a post office, authorities repeatedly refused his submissions because the suggested names were already used by other post offices in the state. He finally submitted the name Telephone, which was accepted, and the post office opened in 1886.  (via Wikipedia)

haveiphone-willtravel:

Telephone, Texas
Population 210

The community received its name because the only telephone in the area was located in a general store owned by Pete Hindman. When Hindman applied for permission to open a post office, authorities repeatedly refused his submissions because the suggested names were already used by other post offices in the state. He finally submitted the name Telephone, which was accepted, and the post office opened in 1886.
(via Wikipedia)

haveiphone-willtravel:

Texas traffic jam

haveiphone-willtravel:

Texas traffic jam

theatlanticcities:

"Map the broadband adoption rates in, say, San Antonio, and a pattern emerges that closely reflects the region’s socioeconomic geography. Households in and around the downtown business district overwhelmingly have broadband. But just west of Interstates 10 and 35, in the adjacent neighborhoods that are home to many of the city’s Hispanic poor, fewer than 20 percent of households do.
From there, starting at the urban core and moving into outer neighborhoods, then into the northern suburbs and beyond, broadband rates appear to swell with income. A related pattern recurs in many cities: People are online in droves – watching Netflix, paying bills, reading the day’s news – downtown and in the suburbs, but not so much in inner-city neighborhoods.
Here is metropolitan San Antonio, on a map created by the Open Technology Institute at the New America Foundation. This picture is divided by Census tract. In the dark-green swathes, more than 80 percent of households have broadband. In the orange ones, fewer than 20 percent do.”
Continue reading: The Most Revealing Broadband Adoption Maps We’ve Ever Seen

theatlanticcities:

"Map the broadband adoption rates in, say, San Antonio, and a pattern emerges that closely reflects the region’s socioeconomic geography. Households in and around the downtown business district overwhelmingly have broadband. But just west of Interstates 10 and 35, in the adjacent neighborhoods that are home to many of the city’s Hispanic poor, fewer than 20 percent of households do.

From there, starting at the urban core and moving into outer neighborhoods, then into the northern suburbs and beyond, broadband rates appear to swell with income. A related pattern recurs in many cities: People are online in droves – watching Netflix, paying bills, reading the day’s news – downtown and in the suburbs, but not so much in inner-city neighborhoods.

Here is metropolitan San Antonio, on a map created by the Open Technology Institute at the New America Foundation. This picture is divided by Census tract. In the dark-green swathes, more than 80 percent of households have broadband. In the orange ones, fewer than 20 percent do.”

Continue reading: The Most Revealing Broadband Adoption Maps We’ve Ever Seen

fancycwabs:

Earlier, I reblogged a post about “who your state loves that other states could kinda take or leave” and noted that that information isn’t that interesting—it’s too obscure in many cases, and easily influenced by an internet-savvy minority.

Much more interesting, to me, was the answer to the question “who does your state hate?” So I looked up every state, and put them all in a spreadsheet, then wrote the results on maps.

The first map is limited to the top 50 artists on Spotify. The second is the top 100, and the third the top 200. I could have also limited data to the top 40 (lots of states hate Chris Brown), the top 500, and the top 1000, but it got increasing obscure and meaningless.

It’s interesting to see the Pacific Northwest change from R. Kelly to Mary J. Blige when offered the option (Maine still HATES R. Kelly, though,) New England’s loathing of George Strait, and the South’s disdain for Hot Chip become apparent as you increase granularity.

Also, Hawaii and Nevada hating Wilco, and Texas hating Bon Iver in the first pass are endlessly amusing.

txdrivebyshooting:

Dallas, Texas - No Entry

txdrivebyshooting:

Dallas, Texas - No Entry

womaninterrupted:

braiker:

shortformblog:

In an effort to emphasize the sanctity of marriage in a state where a judge just struck down a ban on same-sex marriage, Texas State Sen. Dan Patrick made this epic typo.

Sigmund Freud is strong with this one

There is a god.

womaninterrupted:

braiker:

shortformblog:

In an effort to emphasize the sanctity of marriage in a state where a judge just struck down a ban on same-sex marriage, Texas State Sen. Dan Patrick made this epic typo.

Sigmund Freud is strong with this one

There is a god.

“Tech vendors Umbel, AdColony and Vox Media are co-sponsoring an event March 7 in one of the Texas capital’s most-famous music venues, Moody Theater, home to PBS’ acclaimed Austin City Limits. It’s going to be strange. Indie ‘psych-folk’ band Local Natives will take the stage, while street teams dressed as astronauts work the front of the venue and Mexican wrestler ‘El Umbel’ takes selfies with guests. ‘It’s hard to be weird here, but we are going to give it our best shot,’ declares PR rep Lana McGilvray.”

A Marketer’s Guide to SXSW: Brands try to keep Austin wired | Ad Week

Emphasis added. 

PS: Here’s where you can find us during SXSWi. And probably our buddy robotmerle

txdrivebyshooting:

Deep Ellum - JFK

txdrivebyshooting:

Deep Ellum - JFK

haveiphone-willtravel:

Dublin Dr Pepper
Dublin Dr Pepper was the popular name for a style of Dr Pepper soft drink made by the Dublin Dr Pepper Bottling Company in Dublin, Texas. Dublin Dr Pepper followed the original recipe, using cane sugar as the sweetener as opposed to newer high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). The Dublin plant formula’s use of sugar made it popular among soda fans. According to the corporate headquarters at Dr Pepper Snapple Group, this resulted in clashes with other bottlers and the parent company of Dr Pepper. On 12 January 2012, it was announced that Dublin Dr. Pepper will no longer be produced, after the Dublin Dr Pepper Bottling Company settled the trademark dispute instigated by Dr Pepper Snapple Group.
(via Wikipedia)

txdrivebyshooting:

Dallas, Texas - Crow Asian Art Museum

txdrivebyshooting:

Dallas, Texas - Crow Asian Art Museum

ellendegeneres:

Dallas sportscaster Dale Hansen spoke out in support of Michael Sam and the response he’s gotten back has been incredibly positive. What a world. 

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