Fuck Yeah Texas

A collection of what makes this state great.

sphinxnomore:

Cocktail of the Day (Enjoyed poolside on Xmas Eve in South Texas)
Imagine 35 pairs of arms working in tandem to produce a cocktail just for you. If you were in New Orleans for Mardi Gras circa 1915, The Stag saloon would have offered this surreal experience. There, Henry Ramos mixed up his special New Orleans fizzes, believed to be the best in the world.
Ramos invented the drink at his Imperial Cabinet saloon in 1888, when New Orleans was becoming a hot tourist destination, beloved for its quaint, historic saloons. Ramos profited greatly from this boom, as tourists thronged his establishment for a taste of his famous house fizzes. Six bartenders were employed per shift at the Imperial Cabinet, each with his own dedicated “shaker boy,” “a young black man whose sole job was to receive the fully charged shaker from the bartender and shake the bejeezus out of it,” writes David Wondrich in IMBIBE!.
Why all the shaking? This particular fizz recipe calls for egg white and cream, two ingredients that are famously difficult to emulsify. “Shake and shake and shake until there is not a bubble left, but the drink is smooth and snowy white and of the consistency of good rich milk,” Ramos said. If preparing a Ramos Gin Fizz, you’d best bring your guns to the show.
By Mardi Gras in 1915, Ramos had conceived a new format for emulsifying: 35 shakermen would shake the drink until their arms were tired, then pass it on down the line.
1.5 oz gin
0.5 oz fresh lemon juice
0.5 oz fresh lime juice
1.5-2 oz simple syrup, to taste
2 oz heavy cream
0.75 oz egg white
2 drops orange-flower water
club soda
Combine the gin, juices, syrup, cream, egg white and orange-flower water in a mixing glass with ice, and shake long and hard to emulsify the egg. Strain into a highball glass without ice. Top with soda but no garnish.

sphinxnomore:

Cocktail of the Day (Enjoyed poolside on Xmas Eve in South Texas)

Imagine 35 pairs of arms working in tandem to produce a cocktail just for you. If you were in New Orleans for Mardi Gras circa 1915, The Stag saloon would have offered this surreal experience. There, Henry Ramos mixed up his special New Orleans fizzes, believed to be the best in the world.

Ramos invented the drink at his Imperial Cabinet saloon in 1888, when New Orleans was becoming a hot tourist destination, beloved for its quaint, historic saloons. Ramos profited greatly from this boom, as tourists thronged his establishment for a taste of his famous house fizzes. Six bartenders were employed per shift at the Imperial Cabinet, each with his own dedicated “shaker boy,” “a young black man whose sole job was to receive the fully charged shaker from the bartender and shake the bejeezus out of it,” writes David Wondrich in IMBIBE!.

Why all the shaking? This particular fizz recipe calls for egg white and cream, two ingredients that are famously difficult to emulsify. “Shake and shake and shake until there is not a bubble left, but the drink is smooth and snowy white and of the consistency of good rich milk,” Ramos said. If preparing a Ramos Gin Fizz, you’d best bring your guns to the show.

By Mardi Gras in 1915, Ramos had conceived a new format for emulsifying: 35 shakermen would shake the drink until their arms were tired, then pass it on down the line.

1.5 oz gin

0.5 oz fresh lemon juice

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

1.5-2 oz simple syrup, to taste

2 oz heavy cream

0.75 oz egg white

2 drops orange-flower water

club soda

Combine the gin, juices, syrup, cream, egg white and orange-flower water in a mixing glass with ice, and shake long and hard to emulsify the egg. Strain into a highball glass without ice. Top with soda but no garnish.

coolstorygab:

forever in love with #Texas :)

coolstorygab:

forever in love with #Texas :)

50people50places:

Big Bend National Park, Texas

aqwawpa:

This is a huge place out in the middle of nowhere between Mineral Wells and Lipan, Texas. Great food

aqwawpa:

This is a huge place out in the middle of nowhere between Mineral Wells and Lipan, Texas. Great food

beautifulbodegas:

Palacios, Texas 1943 by John Vachon 

beautifulbodegas:

Palacios, Texas 1943 by John Vachon 

texasmonthly:

In the Texas 12 Days of Christmas, our true love brought us brisket and all the fixins. Now, nap time. #bbq #franklin #foodporn #balancedbreakfast (at Texas Monthly)

Ain’t nothing I won’t mop up with a slice of white bread.

texasmonthly:

In the Texas 12 Days of Christmas, our true love brought us brisket and all the fixins. Now, nap time. #bbq #franklin #foodporn #balancedbreakfast (at Texas Monthly)

Ain’t nothing I won’t mop up with a slice of white bread.

jimherrington:

Ray Price has left us. I think it’s safe to say he was the last of the top-tier legendary country artists from the early days. He began performing in Texas in the late 1940s and didn’t stop until this year when cancer forced him to step away from the mic.
Price moved to Nashville in the early ‘50s where he was roommates with Hank Williams for a short time - I like to imagine the two of them bouncing songs off of each other in the living room at 2am. In 1953 Price formed his band the Cherokee Cowboys, an early proving ground for future legends in their own right Willie Nelson, Roger Miller, Johnny Paycheck and others.
I was fortunate to spend a day with Ray in 1999 photographing him for a magazine. He was recording a new album at Ocean Way Studios in Nashville with a band that included his steel player Buddy Emmons from the early Cherokee Cowboys days, longtime Cowboy bandleader and pianist Blondie Calderon as well as a full string section. As the day progressed I noticed that Ray, 74 at the time, would duck outside about every hour or so, coming back in red-eyed and absolutely reeking of reefer. 
The session went late into the evening with just a few of us remaining in the darkened studio - the engineer, Ray in the booth doing the last bit of vocals and drinking from a bottle of tequila, and me in the main room packing up my equipment. Ray finished up for the night and as he walked through the large dark studio towards the exit he passed right behind me he said to the back of my head in that mellow, hep cat Texas twang, “I’ve got some good grass out in the bus…” I remember my first thought was, “the only other person that calls it grass is Robert Mitchum.”
I went out to his bus a few minutes later and as we sat there alone listening to some of the tracks he’d cut earlier in the day I proceeded to learn first hand who really gets the best grass on the planet. Sorry Willie, I didn’t know you didn’t know.
So long and rest in peace to one of the greatest of the greats.
Photo ©Jim Herrington

jimherrington:

Ray Price has left us. I think it’s safe to say he was the last of the top-tier legendary country artists from the early days. He began performing in Texas in the late 1940s and didn’t stop until this year when cancer forced him to step away from the mic.

Price moved to Nashville in the early ‘50s where he was roommates with Hank Williams for a short time - I like to imagine the two of them bouncing songs off of each other in the living room at 2am. In 1953 Price formed his band the Cherokee Cowboys, an early proving ground for future legends in their own right Willie Nelson, Roger Miller, Johnny Paycheck and others.

I was fortunate to spend a day with Ray in 1999 photographing him for a magazine. He was recording a new album at Ocean Way Studios in Nashville with a band that included his steel player Buddy Emmons from the early Cherokee Cowboys days, longtime Cowboy bandleader and pianist Blondie Calderon as well as a full string section. As the day progressed I noticed that Ray, 74 at the time, would duck outside about every hour or so, coming back in red-eyed and absolutely reeking of reefer. 

The session went late into the evening with just a few of us remaining in the darkened studio - the engineer, Ray in the booth doing the last bit of vocals and drinking from a bottle of tequila, and me in the main room packing up my equipment. Ray finished up for the night and as he walked through the large dark studio towards the exit he passed right behind me he said to the back of my head in that mellow, hep cat Texas twang, “I’ve got some good grass out in the bus…” I remember my first thought was, “the only other person that calls it grass is Robert Mitchum.”

I went out to his bus a few minutes later and as we sat there alone listening to some of the tracks he’d cut earlier in the day I proceeded to learn first hand who really gets the best grass on the planet. Sorry Willie, I didn’t know you didn’t know.

So long and rest in peace to one of the greatest of the greats.

Photo ©Jim Herrington

thirtymilesout:

Frank Smith
Cross-B Ranch,
Crosby County, Texas, ca. 1909

thirtymilesout:

Frank Smith

Cross-B Ranch,

Crosby County, Texas, ca. 1909

austinstatesman:

With Mack Brown headed out after the Alamo Bowl, we look back at his 16 years at Texas: http://atxne.ws/18LWJq4
And check out our interactive of Longhorn wins and losses from the 1957 Darrell K Royal era to the present: http://atxne.ws/18LWJGH
Find all our coverage on statesman.com: http://ift.tt/Js95gM
#UT #Longhorns

austinstatesman:

With Mack Brown headed out after the Alamo Bowl, we look back at his 16 years at Texas: http://atxne.ws/18LWJq4

And check out our interactive of Longhorn wins and losses from the 1957 Darrell K Royal era to the present: http://atxne.ws/18LWJGH

Find all our coverage on statesman.com: http://ift.tt/Js95gM

#UT #Longhorns

allpoison:

Texans do it right👍🍔🍟

allpoison:

Texans do it right👍🍔🍟

currently-coveting:

Definitely not in NYC anymore. #whataburger

currently-coveting:

Definitely not in NYC anymore. #whataburger

thpffbt:

Whataguy fanart.

thpffbt:

Whataguy fanart.

Bless your heart Bobby.

(Source: sirheisenberg)

exiledintejas:

Are YOU ready for some football!!?? - Spotted at the Austin City Wide Garage Sale.

exiledintejas:

Are YOU ready for some football!!?? - Spotted at the Austin City Wide Garage Sale.

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